Neuroscientists say modern technology is changing the way our brains work.

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Neuroscientists say modern technology is changing the way our brains work.

The identity of a person, this definition of each individual, is likely to face an unprecedented crisis.

It’s a crisis that threatens who we are, what we do, and how we behave in the long term.

This is just the heart – or the brain for all of us. This crisis may reshape how we communicate with each other, change what makes us happy, and change our ability as individuals to reach our potential.

This is caused by a simple fact: the human brain, the most sensitive organ, is threatened by the modern world.

Neuroscientists say modern technology is changing the way our brains work.

Susan greenfield.

The identity of a person, this definition of each individual, is likely to face an unprecedented crisis.

It’s a crisis that threatens who we are, what we do, and how we behave in the long term.

This is just the heart – or the brain for all of us. This crisis may reshape how we communicate with each other, change what makes us happy, and change our ability as individuals to reach our potential.

This is caused by a simple fact: the human brain, the most sensitive organ, is threatened by the modern world.

Professor Susan greenfield.

Professor Susan greenfield.

Enhanced drugs unless we think of the 21st century of our brain damage caused by, or we may be in in the future, in the future, neural chip technology blurs the boundaries between machines and inanimate life, our body and the outside world.

In such a world, such devices can enhance our muscle strength or beyond our normal senses, and we take some drugs every day to control our emotions and performance.

An electronic chip is being developed to allow a paralysed patient to move a robotic limb just by thinking about it. As for drug manipulation, they have been with us – although, so far, only in medical terms.

More and more people have taken prozac to treat depression, and pasil as a shy antidote, and giving ritalin a boost of attention. But what if there were more drugs to enhance or “correct” a range of other specific psychological functions?

What would this “perfect” or “better” wish look like for our identity? What do you think about people who can’t take drugs? Will some people be more equal than others, as George Orwell always feared?

Of course, technological advances are good, but they are also very dangerous, and I believe we have seen some of them today.

I am a neuroscientist, and my daily research at Oxford University has sought to have a deeper understanding of alzheimer’s disease – and perhaps one day, this is a cure.

But one of the most important things I’ve learned is that the brain is not a constant organ that we can imagine. It not only continue to develop, change, and in the case of some tragic end up as the growth of the age and deteriorate, which is by the things we do with it and the experience of everyday life. When I say “shaping”, I do not speak in parables or parables; I’m talking. At the microcellular level, the infinitely complex network of nerve cells that form part of the brain is actually changed by some experience and stimulus.

In other words, the brain is malleable — not just in childhood, but in early adulthood and in some cases. The environment around us has a huge impact on how our brains develop and how our brains turn into a unique human mind.

Of course, this is nothing new: the human brain has been changing, adapting and developing for hundreds of years in response to external stimuli.

What prompted me to write my book was a dramatic increase in the pace of external environmental change and the development of new technologies. This will affect our brains in ways that we may not have imagined in the next 100 years.

Our brains are being affected by the expanding new technology world: multichannel television, video games, MP3 players, the Internet, wireless networks, bluetooth links – lists are popping up.

Lovers play video.

Lovers play video.

But we have to adapt to modern people’s brain also other invasion of the 21st century, some of the prescription drug such as prozac and ritalin should be good, some of these drugs, widespread illegal drugs such as marijuana and heroin, not.

Electronic devices and drugs affect the microcellular structure and complex biochemistry of our brains. And that in turn affects our personalities, behaviors and characteristics. In short, the modern world may well be changing our human identity.

Three hundred years ago, our concept of human identity became very simple: we were defined by the family we were born in and the place we were in the family. Social progress is almost impossible, and the concept of “individuality” is backwards.

The industrial revolution has only just arrived, and this is the first time it has offered incentives for initiative, creativity and ambition. Suddenly, people have their own life stories – stories that can be shaped by their own thoughts and actions. For the first time, a person has a real sense of self.

But now that our brains are being attacked by this universal attack in the modern world, it is possible to diminish or even lose our sense of self.

Anyone who doubts the plasticity of the adult brain should consider an astonishing study at harvard medical school. There, a group of adult volunteers who had not played piano before were divided into three groups.

The first group was taken into a room with the piano and practiced for five days. The second group was taken to a similar room with the same piano – but had nothing to do with the instrument.

The third group was taken to the same piano room and told that for the next five days they had to imagine that they were practicing the piano.

The resulting brain scans are unusual. Not surprisingly, the brains of those who sit in the same room with the piano have not changed at all.

Equally unsurprising was the dramatic structural changes in the areas of the brain associated with the movements of the fingers.

But the real surprise was that those who only thought of playing the piano saw changes in the structure of the brain, almost as much as those that had actually been learned. The power of imagination is not a metaphor; This is true, there is a physical basis in your brain.

Alas, no neuroscientist has ever been able to explain how the change in the harvard experimenters at the micro level translates into a change in personality, personality or behavior. But we don’t need to know that the change in brain structure is inextricably linked to our higher thought feelings.

What worries me is that if you could imagine the piano course harmless things can cause the obvious physical changes of brain structure, and therefore are interested players showed small changes, the long-term changes of playing violent computer games would bring what kind of change? The eternal damsel protested that “this is just a game, mom” must start a shocking void.

It is now clear that so many teenagers and a growing number of adults are choosing a screen based two-dimensional world that is making behavioral changes. The attention span is shortened, personal communication skills are reduced, and the ability of abstract thinking is obviously reduced.

This game – driven generation interprets the world through the shape of a screen. It’s almost like Posting on Facebook, Bebo or YouTube.

Plus the vast amount of personal information stored on the Internet today – births, marriages, phone Numbers, credit ratings, holiday snaps – sometimes it’s hard to know where our personal boundaries are. Only one thing is certain: those boundaries are weakening.

And if neurochip technology becomes more widespread, they may weaken further. These tiny devices will make use of the discovery that nerve cells and silicon chips can coexist happily, allowing the interface between the electronic world and the human body. One of my colleagues recently recommended that anyone can install artificial cochlea (convert sound waves into electrical impulses and makes the deaf hear device) and converting brain waves into text skeleton microchip (prototype) in the research.

So, if two devices are connected to a wireless network, we’ll really get to the point where science fiction writers have been excited for years. Mind reading!

He was joking, but it was still unclear how long it would last.

Today’s technology has changed dramatically in our thinking and behavior, especially among young people.

But I can’t be too strict, because what I say is happiness. For some people, happiness means wine, women and songs. For others, recently, sex, drugs and rock and roll; And for today’s millions, in the computer console endless hours.

But no matter what kind of entertainment do you like (needs to be added to the list of energetic sports), it has long been recognized that the “pure” happy – that is to say, you really “put down your heart” – is a diversified portfolio of normal human life. So far, that’s it.

Now, as technology and pharmaceutical companies are looking for more ways to directly influence the human brain, happiness is becoming the only ultimate goal in many people’s lives, especially young people.

We can cultivate the hedonist generation, who can only live at the moment of computer generation, and it is very different from what others will think of as the real world.

This is a trend that worries me deeply. Because any alcoholic or drug addict will tell you that no one can ever be stuck in a happy moment. Sooner or later, you have to come down.

I of course is not to say that all video games are addictive, so far there are no enough research to support), I really welcome to a new generation of “brain training”, computer games designed to keep small gray cell active longer.

As my alzheimer’s study shows, when it comes to higher brain function, it’s clear that the adage “use it or lose it” makes sense.

However, playing certain games may mimic addiction, and the heaviest users in these games may soon start to be a good imitation of a drug addict.

In computer games boom, with an indirect evidence that the sharp rise in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder diagnosis and ritalin prescription associated in the past decade is associated with increased three times, and you have a very worrying situation.

But we cannot be pessimistic about the future. This may sound Orwellian, but there may be some potential advantages from our understanding of the enormous plasticity of the human brain. What if we could create an environment that would allow the brain to develop in a way that is considered universally beneficial?

I don’t believe scientists will find a way to manipulate the brain to make us smarter (it might be cheaper and more efficient to manipulate education systems). And I don’t believe that we can be happier in some way — at least, not in some way, in our own grief and suffering as part of the human condition.

When the one I love dies, I still want to be able to cry.

But I paradoxically see the potential in a particular direction. I think that we might one day be able to take advantage of external stimuli, so that creativity – of course, the ultimate expression of individuality – is actually promoted rather than diminished.

I am optimistic and excited that future research will reveal the workings of the human brain and the extraordinary process of transforming it into a unique personal thought.

But I also worry that we seem to be oblivious to the dangers we already have.

So the debate is about to begin. Identity, as human nature, can be changed – good or bad. Our children, and of course our grandchildren, will not thank us if we delay the discussion again.

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